SROI – at the awkward adolescent stage?

The SROI methodology for valuing impacts is coming of age. But it is a difficult age which begs important questions. The biggest question is perhaps the presumption that a valuation can be achieved through assigning quantitative financial values to any kind of impact.

After that, perhaps the next most important is: what should it be used for? . . . → Read More: SROI – at the awkward adolescent stage?

Is reporting child’s play?

The ACCA has recently published a report on the reporting of child rights issues, in which I was involved.

The abuse of child rights is one of the most serious issues that a company can face. More than any other it has the potential to bring down any organisation associated with it. That is because . . . → Read More: Is reporting child’s play?

The price of a cup of tea

The BBC’s investigation of workers’ conditions on tea plantations in Assam makes depressing reading. The squalor and poverty behind one of the world’s favourite drinks is appalling.

It is striking that the response of Unilever, a company often held up as a beacon of responsibility and sustainability, is so weak. According to the BBC, Unilever . . . → Read More: The price of a cup of tea

What hope for corporate accountability

Here are some musings on the – rather sad – state of corporate accountability in 2015. It is a report of a conversation I had with the folk at the SustainAbility consultancy.

The advantages of second sight

We all love a good Post Office,  I’m sure – but what happens when the Post Office goes bad?

A few days ago we learned that the continuing rumbles about the training for and the functioning of the Post Office’s key operational Horizon computer system, introduced in 2000, did have some foundation. Or at least I think . . . → Read More: The advantages of second sight

The disappointment of mergers and acquisitions

Do mergers and acquisitions make sense?

Kraft and Heinz are to merge. Is that good or bad? The answer depends on who you are. But mergers and acquisitions rarely create shareholder value, according to received wisdom. Of course some (some shareholders, the advisers) are going to benefit otherwise they wouldn’t happen. But the businesses as a . . . → Read More: The disappointment of mergers and acquisitions

What’s wrong with finance?

Why are there so many scandals within the finance sector? From the many news reports the banking, finance and insurance sector across the world seems rife with malpractice.

Insurance seems to be commonly mis-sold – to those who don’t need it and to those who don’t care enough to shop around at the end of the . . . → Read More: What’s wrong with finance?

What are corporate citizens to do when there’s an election?

The answer isn’t to vote – unless of course you are based in the City of London when the number of voters you can appoint for local elections is proportional to the number of your staff.

But there’s a general election coming up, so what can a corporate citizen do?

Businesses have a great interest in . . . → Read More: What are corporate citizens to do when there’s an election?

The social case for value

How does an organisation find out whether it is doing its part to justify its licence to operate? See my guest blog here.


Why is it so taxing?

Starbucks was recently accused of paying almost no tax in the UK. In fact it claims it won’t be doing so for several more years. The fact that this has gone on for about 16 years is surely not a testament to the incompetence of its management but to the commitment Starbucks has to the UK, where . . . → Read More: Why is it so taxing?