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The social case for value

How does an organisation find out whether it is doing its part to justify its licence to operate? See my guest blog here.

 

Why is it so taxing?

Starbucks was recently accused of paying almost no tax in the UK. In fact it claims it won’t be doing so for several more years. The fact that this has gone on for about 16 years is surely not a testament to the incompetence of its management but to the commitment Starbucks has to the UK, where . . . → Read More: Why is it so taxing?

Unilever has such a nice image

But is it complicit with the TTIP process?

Articles like this one in the Guardian have celebrated the virtues and actions of Unilever in both environmental and social fields. And it is true that they have done a number of positive things and Paul Polman, their CEO, seems personally committed to sustainability. You would have thought . . . → Read More: Unilever has such a nice image

Asda: discounting women?

It may not be quite two women for the price of one man, but Asda appears to have a problem with equal pay. The wider Walmart group, of which Asda is the UK arm has a long history of troubled labour relations – but you might expect a better outcome in the UK, since it is the only country . . . → Read More: Asda: discounting women?

Those that sell to children should report to them

Sustainability and CSR reports are rarely read – with the exception of those who write them and those who audit them. That doesn’t make them useless. At their best, they provide an anchor point and focus for those within companies trying to manage business impacts.

Still, that is a lot of time and money spent on little return. . . . → Read More: Those that sell to children should report to them

The ebola to come

A worldwide ebola pandemic is looking increasingly likely. This may not be the time to come over apocalyptic, but it probably is time to reflect on why the world is so susceptible to such diseases. And why the consequences could be so devastating to society – and also to the economy.

Physical health risks are . . . → Read More: The ebola to come

Tesco: capitalism at the end of the road?

Tesco seems to have been cannibalizing not only its own supply chain but also itself – or at least its own accounting practices. Its accounting was designed to push up profits. And that relentless push for profits has also lead to ever-increasing pressure on supermarkets’ supply chains. As a result suppliers pay in every sense to have . . . → Read More: Tesco: capitalism at the end of the road?

Do men behaving badly damage business?

American Apparel has been rebuked in the UK for the sixth time in two and a half years over its advertising. Each time for being offensive to women. It seems the corporate culture behind the ads has affected its share price – which has continued to fall over the past five years, while the markets as . . . → Read More: Do men behaving badly damage business?

Is there no accounting for human rights?

There should be! See my blog for the ACCA.

If ‘social value’ is the answer, what’s the question?

Here is my blog on the problems with social value and social impact.