Data privacy: are human rights for sale?

How do you balance privacy and transparency? When they conflict, which should win?

See my post here on C&E Advisory’s website.

How much is a human being worth?

Over recent months the government has declared that employees (including bosses) should be neither over-paid nor under-paid. That’s fine – but how do you judge what is too much or too little?

It turns out that at the top, the level of pay for CEOs currently bears no relationship to performance, as measured by return . . . → Read More: How much is a human being worth?

The press cannot regulate itself

The main mass circulation UK newspapers have set up IPSO to regulate themselves. Everyone else wants something independent of the newspapers to regulate the industry. The main alternative proposal is Impress, supported by Max Mosley and the Rowntree Trust.

The newspapers say that if anyone else controls them it could mean the end of press . . . → Read More: The press cannot regulate itself

Where does everything come from?

And for that matter, where does everything go?

We live in a world with global supply chains and apparently bottomless consumption. The demands of the market are that companies get stuff and sell it – but they do not often remember where it came from and perhaps don’t much care where it goes. So to . . . → Read More: Where does everything come from?

Quantitative Pleasing – how many is too much

The ICAEW have published my report on the perils of quantification and what can be done about it. Using the examples social and natural capital, it sets out guidelines for when and how quantification should be attempted – and what to do when it should not be done.

The advantages of second sight

We all love a good Post Office, I’m sure – but what happens when the Post Office goes bad?

A few days ago we learned that the continuing rumbles about the training for and the functioning of the Post Office’s key operational Horizon computer system, introduced in 2000, did have some foundation. Or at least . . . → Read More: The advantages of second sight

The limits to transparency

Is the end (of the internet) nigh?

The recent EU Court ruling that Google must remove harmful material from its search results is very sensible. This was based on finding Google responsible for its search results and that they were harmful to an individual. But the reaction to the judgement has been somewhat hysterical: will . . . → Read More: The limits to transparency

How transparent is it possible to be?

Vodafone is trying to put pressure on the government to allow it to disclose requests for wiretaps. Vodafone aims to follow in the footsteps of Google which has been issuing ‘transparency reports’ for a few years.

As the Guardian reports, UK regulations make even the disclosure of the existence of warrants an offence. The current . . . → Read More: How transparent is it possible to be?

How well do you know your government?

The role of the public sector is changing. Activities that were once deemed to be a natural part of the function of the state, are now being carried out by the private sector. Whether in health, education, transport or security, large parts of the job of the delivery of services paid for by the state . . . → Read More: How well do you know your government?

The Social Stock Exchange: making an impact by creating value?

The idea of increasing the flow of funds to social enterprises is a great idea. But how do we know that they really are social enterprises? Would Unilever count? What about Green & Black’s? See my Guardian blog here, which discusses some of the problems of knowing what to measure.